How Medication Manufacturers Conspire to for profit rather than our health

Psychiatric Drugs lead to mass murders and yet many news outlets blame the guns instead.

Is This the Medical Reason Mass Shootings Occur?

What caused the recent mass shooting in Florida? Some say it’s the NRA and guns. Others say it’s mental illness. Still others insist that it’s due to a
lack of security. But, what you won’t hear is something that could come much closer to the real truth. Nearly every mass shooting over the last 20
years has had one thing in common … drugs. And not street drugs. I’m talking about the drugs that doctors prescribe.

In a story entitled, “Florida school shooting suspect was ex-student who was flagged as threat,” the Miami Herald quotes an in-law of the family, who
“said she believed Nikolas Cruz was on medication to deal with his emotional fragility.” Other media sources including the Washington Post have
reported that the shooter was treated in a “mental health” clinic, which of course means that it is very likely that he was being prescribed one or more
mind-altering, antidepressant drugs. And here’s why this detail is so important.

These drugs are the common thread in nearly all school shootings and most suicides. For more details go to www.psychdrugshooters.com. The site
details over 100 school shootings carried out by individuals who were taking psychiatric medications. And according to Medwatch statistics, 63,000
people in the U.S. have committed suicide while on antidepressant drugs. And the effects seem to be especially pronounced in young people.
The package inserts for these drugs clearly state, “Antidepressants increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in pediatric and young adult
patients.” The insert goes on to say that doctors should, “Counsel family members or caregivers of patients to monitor for changes in behavior and
to alert the healthcare provider.” And that’s not all.

In 2007, the FDA admitted in a memorandum that SSRIs, the most common antidepressant drugs, can cause psychotic behavior at all ages. This is
why daily monitoring is needed. The memorandum further explained:
“All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for clinical worsening,
suicidality, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of a course of drug therapy, or at times of dose changes, either
increases or decreases. The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity,
akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with
antidepressants.” But it gets worse.

Just this past September The British Medical Journal published an article by Professor Peter C. Gøtzsche. Dr. Gøtzsche is a Danish physician,
renowned medical researcher, and leader of the Nordic Cochrane Center at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark. He co-founded and has written
numerous reviews within the Cochrane collaboration. The title of Dr. Gøtzsche’s article was, “Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide, violence,
and homicide at all ages.” What he has to say is astounding.

Dr. Gøtzsche looked at 64,381 pages of clinical study reports from 70 different trials. According to Dr. Gøtzsche’s findings, the SSRI antidepressant
drugs increase aggression in children and adolescents 279%!

In addition, he discovered in a systematic review of placebo-controlled trials in adult healthy volunteers that the use of antidepressants almost
doubled the occurrence of events that the FDA has defined as possible precursors to suicide and violence.

Gøtzsche’s study also reports that women taking a common antidepressant drug by the trade name of Cymbalta were 4-5 times more likely to commit
suicide or acts of violence than similar women not taking the drug. They were also almost three times as likely to experience “a core or potential
psychotic event.” And, here’s why this situation is especially tragic.

For the most part, these drugs don’t work nearly as well as natural alternatives. I have been able to take many patients off these drugs using an
individualized combination of amino acids therapies, nutritional therapies, neurofeedback, and sometimes counseling. And that indicates that the
drugs were never needed in the first place.

I would conservatively estimate that more than 90% of people taking these drugs don’t really need them. And that means less side effects, a better
life, and a reduced risk of suicide and violence. You have to wonder if almost all of the school shootings would have been avoided if this non-drug
approach was a common practice.

So, if you are on one of these drugs, or especially if your children are being prescribed the drugs, please consult with a practitioner versed in the
natural treatment of depression. See our resource section below for help in finding a practitioner.

REFS:

Antidepressants increase the risk of suicide, violence and homicide at all ages. By Peter Gøtzsche. http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3697/rr-4

Bielefeldt AØ, Danborg PB, Gøtzsche PC. Precursors to suicidality and violence on antidepressants: systematic review of trials in adult healthy
volunteers. J R Soc Med 2016;109:381-392.

FDA. Antidepressant use in children, adolescents, and adults. http://www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/informationbydrugclass/ucm096273.htm.

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-02-16-psych-drug-shooters-florida-school-shooter-was-on-medication-reports-miami-herald-just-like-nearly-all-
the-others.html

Maund E, Guski LS, Gøtzsche PC. Considering benefits and harms of duloxetine for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of
clinical study reports. CMAJ 2017;189:E194-203.

Psych drug shooters: Florida school shooter “was on medication,” reports Miami Herald, just like nearly all other mass shooters – NaturalNews.com.

Sharma T, Guski LS, Freund N, Gøtzsche PC. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses
based on clinical study reports. BMJ 2016;352:i65.



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